Our Toyo Mud Terrain tyres trump BFG, 2019 report

We purchased x5 Toyo 255/85 Mud Terrain (MT) Open Country tyres at the end of 2012 from Silverline in Warrick together with five steel modular rims in the UK (http://silverlinewheels-tyres.com) just before our 18278km Africa overland trip, which went onto the Toyota Land Cruiser 90 series Prado together with some five 255/85 BFG MT K2 tyres and rims, which went onto our other Toyota LJ70 2.5 TD short wheel base. My father drove this vehicle from north to south.

Since then we have travelled extensively across South Africa with the 90 series and have just returned from a trip over the Swartberg Mountain Pass using the same reliable Toyo MT’s.

Regarding the tyres, we have to comment again; the low asphalt road noise sound was astounding and the performance on the rocky gravelled rocky roads up and down the Swartberg pass, which is rugged and poorly maintained was spectacular with loads of grip in 4×4 especially on large correlation corners into sharp switch back bends on both ascent and descent.

The Swartberg Pass in stunning, an absolute must with your journey in the Western Cape South Africa, we have never seen rock striations like this which have been bent over millions of years.

Since then the BFG MT’s as previous posts have been replaced years ago after one literally exploded in Namibia which was disappointing. We had high hopes following the overland trip but time caught up very quickly with them and they could not stand up to the Toyo’s half life, which continues today. They were completely shadowed by the Toyo’s in every respect.

We are unbiased in our personal and ongoing conclusions which stems now from the end of 2012 and the road test will continue into the future as we are sure we’ll get in next years 2020 north Zimbabwe 4×4 trip on the same Toyo MT tyres.

We’ve driven both tyre brands across Europe, Turkey, Israel, Jordan, the Nubian desert in Sudan, on rocky roads in northern Kenya, through deep mud tracks in Nechisar National Park (Arba Minc, Ethiopia) and through numerous river crossing across the Africa continent and down some great high speed asphalt highway roads (N1, N2 and N3 South Africa). And hence have experienced all conditions and am astounded how much tread blocks remain. We’ve taken a few more pictures from last weekend’s safari stay in the Klein Karoo lodge 15 kms east of Oudtshoorn and the tyres continue to shine in all conditions. Check out the tyre tread blocks.

For reliability, performance and cost effectiveness, these Toyo¬†MT’s are unrivalled so please consider them when you ask dealers for future quotations! Buying so called big brand expensive BFG’s makes no sense when you can get these 4×4 Japanese Toyo (https://www.toyotires.com/about-us) tyres which we’ve personally tested in mud, sand, rivers, asphalt and now recommend to adventure families looking for reliable and safe means of motor transport for their overland trips. My good friend has just bought BFG AT’s and his defender has just returned from Namibia with a puncture caused by stones. The proof is in the pudding, we will always enquire first for Toyo’s as our replacement brand when time come for a new set of 5.

Toyo5Toyo4Toyo3Toyo2Toyo1

We will continue to give you further informative reports through the life of our Toyo MT’s, we hope you get inspired for your next adventure overland trip with yourselves and the kids.

Until next time.

 

About familyinafrica

Passionate about travelling with my family, nature, raising awareness for wildlife conservation projects and teaching my fellow man about travelling community health.
This entry was posted in Amazing drives, Egypt, Ethiopia, Europe, Israel, Kenya, Malawi, Our journey, Overland Prices, Tyres, Western Cape and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.